conservation and restoration of ethnic art and archaeology

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Conservation

can be divided in ‘passive conservation’ and ‘active conservation’.


The aim of passive conservation is to conserve an object by creating the best possible environment. Control over light, humidity and temperature are very important. Air pollution and contact with agressive products can also contribute to degradation.


Active conservation is a ‘hands-on’ intervention to slow down, or if possible, to stop deterioration of an object.


Some examples:

  1. treatment against woodworm and/or mould

  2. consolidation of wood, paint layers or crumbling terracotta

  3. desalination of terracotta

  4. fixation of pigments

  5. reattachment of loose parts

  6. cleaning

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1/ termite’s gluttony

2/ flaking paint, caused by migrating salts

3/ minuscule ‘craters’, material pushed off by migrating salts

4/ flaking paint layer

5/ cracked terracotta

6/ damage due to woodworm

7/ mould

8/ damage due to woodworm

9/ cleaning of polychrome terracotta

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